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Luca Studio has designed a truly unique bottle-cutting product, which allows for glass to be cut in any shape.

HONG KONG, Hong Kong –Luca Studio introduces the Luca Bottle Cutter, a new way to create interior design and home décor items. Unlike other bottle and glasscutters on the market, which only allow for straight line cuts, the Luca Cutter enables curved and personally designed cuts. To manufacture the product, a crowdfunding campaign has been launched through Indiegogo with a goal of $10,000 USD and a project end date of November 16, 2014.

Luca Bottle Cutter is a hand held tool for cutting glass that is ergonomic and easy-to-use. A unique feature allows do-it-yourselfers to cut glass bottles and flat glass in curves along with regular straight lines. With an integrated ball bearing, the tool turns freely and will turn as the cutter is leaned from side to side. The design also includes four legs that bear on the material, ensuring that the blade does not slip and creating a smooth and steady leaning effect.

To make regular straight line cuts, the cutter uses the straight-line kit set. With proper adjustment, the user can ensure that it makes an even cut around the entire bottle. The cutter makes a score line on the glass material. The user then applies heat to the glass and thermal expansion cuts the material right on the score line. Once the glass is cut, it can be sanded with one of the grit size sandpapers that are included with the kit.

It has a minimalist design, made with laser cut high quality plywood. Many home décor pieces can be created with the Luca Bottle Cutter. Ideas can be found on the crowdfunding website at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/luca-bottle-cutter–2. Supporters of the campaign can receive the new product by pledging just $35 USD.

About Luca Studio:

Luca Studio was founded by a group of friends in Hong Kong with innovative design ideas. The Luca Bottle Cutter is the company’s first product. More neat products are to be released soon. Visit the website at www.lucastudio.net

 


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